Managing Mobile Device Security in Healthcare

 

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The use of mobile devices in healthcare is growing. More than half of doctors use tablets for their practice and 74% also use smartphone for professional purposes. However, with the efficiency that mobile technology brings, there is also risks of data infringement. Tablets or smartphones set down momentarily in an examining room leave private patient information exposed and with more devices in play, the more vulnerable becomes a healthcare network to breaches.

These best practices for healthcare workers using mobile devices help prevent data breaches.

  1. Implement auto-locking features on devices. When a tablet or smartphone is set down it should automatically require password access to open. Activating this feature ensures information remains protected in the device.
  2. Use privacy filters. Physicians may be wary of their digital device use in the office, but may feel more comfortable outside work using the same device. Prying eyes can see screens which may contain patient information. Blackout privacy filters ensure that no one can see the screen from side views. Only the user of the device can see the contents of the screen. Learn more about blackout privacy screens for mobile devices
  3. Use remote lock features. If a device is stolen, a physician can implement this feature to completely lock the device after several failed attempts at guessing a password.
  4. Use encryption. Transferred data from phones to tablets to laptops is becoming the norm in healthcare, which can leave emails and attachments exposed. All transferred data should be encrypted to prevent breaches.
  5. Update security software. Once hackers identity a device as used by a healthcare professional, they may be more persistent in their hacking attempts to access the confidential data. Updating security software across all devices helps prevent harmful apps and malware from infiltrating networks.

 

Traveling with your digital devices? Here are some things you might need.

 

Phones, laptops and tablets help us stay productive, pass the time and keep us networked while traveling.  Here are a few extras that can help enhance that on-the-road digital experience.

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Privacy Filters

On a crowded airplane, that casual glance at your laptop screen be annoying. Take the precaution of a privacy filter for peace of mind. Blackout privacy filters completely black out the side view of your laptop or tablet and even some smartphone screens(depends on the model). Yet the straight on view of the screen for you is completely clear. Privacy filter technology is improving, make screens easier to attach and remove for those occasions when you want to show someone your screen. Otherwise, even if you are not necessarily looking at confidential info, it’s still more comforting to keep your screen private.

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Tablet Portfolios

Tablets are especially useful for business trips. They are compact and versatile and are quickly becoming one of the go-to digital technologies for quick and easy digital presentations. Now you can improve the productivity of your tablet by accessorizing. Tablet folios feature new designs that allow you to view your tablet free standing, or hand held, in vertical or horizontal orientations and in several different viewing angles. Executive folios even come with a Bluetooth keyboard.  And it doesn’t matter whether you are left handed or right handed, new folio designs accommodate both. It’s also nice to have traditional stand-bys with your tablet—such a writing pad, pen and business card holder, a few perks that make traveling with your tablet more productive.

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Laptop Lapdesk

As wonderful as laptops are for travel, on a long flight they can leave your lap a little warm, if not hot. Lapdesks eliminate the burn. With built in cooling channels  you will never suffer from scorched thigh syndrome again. Modern designs also feature bumpers that keep the laptop securely in place and slightly angled for easy typing. Toss one in your briefcase or bag pack for your next trip.

What Office Managers May Need to Get for Open Space Offices

 

NY-DC079_OFFICE_P_20140706171723.jpgOpen office plans may not only change our work patterns, but also the office products we use everyday. Less reliance on the cubicle means workers are no longer tied to the desktop computer.  This new found freedom however, also introduces issues for office managers. How do you equip office staff who may have smaller work stations, or even no workstations at all?

While the average worker had 225 square feet of space in 2010, by 2017 that figure will fall 33 percent, to 151 square feet, according to data from CoreNet Global.

 

Laptops: Mobility vs. Discomfort

Laptops are designed to be slim and portable, but not necessarily comfortable. Flat keyboards and touchpads reintroduce ergonomic issues that were resolved with the proper desktop computer accessories.

To help reduce wrist strain, or laptopitis, the laptop lap desk creates proper elevation of the laptop as well as providing a secure cushioned platform on which to rest it while working.

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Overdependence on Digital: Does Anybody Have a Pen?

Sometimes moving freely throughout an open office plan with your electronic devices can mean having the entire internet at your disposal, yet not having quick access to something as simple and necessary as a pen and paper. After all, there are  occasions when with tablet in one hand and phone in the other, you may desperately need to simply write down a phone number.

With the new MobilePro Series, tablet accessory, you can integrate your iPad with office basics like pen, paper and business cards. So no matter where you are brainstorming in the latest upscale open office space, you can jot down notes and check your email.

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No Walls: Collaboration vs. Intrusion

One of the most discussed issues of open office plans is the reduction of personal space. Though cubicle walls seem to create isolation, they also provide some personal privacy. Though the idea that open floor plans would encourage collaboration and engagement between workers seems interesting, in some cases that loss of boundaries feels like intrusion, especially when working with mobile electronic devices. Casual glances at what is on your laptop or tablet screen, or even your smartphone ,may not seem like a serious offense, but could end up making everyone a bit more guarded.

Maintaining personal privacy with privacy screens can help reduce that sense of intrusion. With PrivaScreen blackout privacy filters you create peripheral blind sides that prevent prying eyes from viewing your screen. Not only for laptops, you can also get privacy filters for tablets and phones.

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Establishing a Visual Security Policy for Your Business

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While many businesses take strong measures to protect against data breaches, investing in firewalls and other technology to defend their computers, the impact of a visual security breach is sometimes forgotten. Recent research reveals the apparent ease and risk with which visual data security breaches can occur on a regular basis.

A survey of IT professionals conducted by BH Consulting for this paper found that:

  • 85% of those surveyed admitted to seeing sensitive information on screen that they were not authorized to see
  • 82% admitted that it was possible information on their screens could have been viewed by unauthorized personnel
  • 82% had little or no confidence that users in their organization would protect their screen from being viewed by unauthorized people*

 

The risk for businesses ranges from identity theft of customer information and the legal consequences that can bring, as well as acts of corporate spies internally accessing confidential data that could compromise your business.

Establishing a visual security policy helps prevent this overlooked data breach within your business. Here are some simple guidelines for helping create that policy:

 

  1. Organizing and Classifying Confidential Data

Knowing what information in your company is confidential is the first step in protecting it. Classify data by different levels of security so that you can define who has access and who should not.

  1. Establish Accessibility Safeguards

Limit accessibility to certain individuals to your various data sets.  Giving the role of accessibility management also ensures responsibility and accountability if a data breach occurs.

  1. Monitor Access

Knowing when individuals log in and out is key in determining who sees sensitive data and when. This is valuable information when investigating a breach and also helps deter any inappropriate actions, once employees know their access is being monitored.

  1. Installing Password Protected Screensavers

Anyone can quickly view information on an unattended computer screen. Password protected screen savers automatically activate to secure those screens.

  1. Install Privacy Filters on Company Computers

   Blackout privacy filters can prevent shoulder surfing, ensuring data is secure even when  employees are working at their computers.

      6. Train Employees on Using Company Devices Outside the Office

Company phones, laptops and tablets are always vulnerable when employees access confidential company information while on business trips, or even while out to lunch. Keeping these devices protected with privacy filters for portable devices can help protect that information. However, employees should also be instructed on the risks of shoulder surfing, especially in a crowded location. If they need to access confidential information on their device, they should be wary of their surroundings, preferably accessing the information in a more isolated area.

 

 

Use this simple guide to determine the right privacy filter size for any device.  The Perfect Fit Selector Tool.

Find all available devices in this privacy filter device directory.

http://www.visualdatasecurity.eu/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Visual-Data-Security-White-Paper.pdf